Multilingual Shared Services Recruitment

Reed has a proven track record in quickly finding you high standard multilingual shared services professionals.

Start a conversation with one of our specialist multilingual shared services recruiters

Send a brief overview of your requirements and we will match you with the right staff or support professionals.

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We know multilingual shared services recruitment

At Reed, we have paired companies with local multilingual shared services professionals for decades. Our specialist multilingual shared services recruitment consultants are based across Hungary, giving us a combination of national reach and local market knowledge when supporting you with your next hire.

We recruit for a range of multilingual shared services jobs working across a variety of areas, including private sector and local authorities. When working with us, you will work with a dedicated specialist to ensure a smooth and robust recruitment process.

With our rigorous checks and testing to protect your business from risk, you can rely on us to find temporary, permanent or interim solutions to meet your needs.

And understand your pain points...

  • Cost savings

    • Each time your direct hiring process is extended or doesn’t work out, your costs increase. By working with us we can save you time and money in the long-run.

    • We offer a variety of service options to suit all requirements, from staged payments to help manage your cash flow to industry-leading guarantees of up to 12 months to give you that added peace of mind.

  • Handling counteroffers

    • There’s nothing worse than going through a thorough process and pinpointing the perfect recruit, only for them to accept another offer. This is regular challenge in the current market, with professionals in high demand. They will often have several offers at any one time, as well as being counter offered by their current employer.

    • Our experienced consultants always highlight the prospect of counteroffers throughout the engagement process with both you and your prospective employee, and take the time assess their motivations, skills and salary expectations to ensure they are just as committed to the process as you are. We also offer you our years of knowledge and up-to-date insight into your industry, in areas such as the latest benefits and salary benchmarks. You can use this knowledge to create an overall package which stands out against your competitors.

  • Candidate suitability

    • At Reed, our consultants work in partnership with you to get a clear understanding of your business and requirements for the role. Combined with access to our extensive professional networks, candidate database and in-depth market knowledge, we ensure that the only candidates you speak to are those who will be a great fit for your position. As well as saving you time and money, this ultimately ensures you hire and retain the right professionals with the required skillset in the geographical location you desire.

  • Candidates only seeking remote working

    • All applicants that we consider for your roles are fully vetted and undergo an interview process with your Reed specialist consultant. At this stage, we confer with you on any pre-screening questions you require, whether that be about their remote working expectations or whether working on weekends is required.

    • This helps us ensure all applicants are assessed to your specification before we recommend them for interviews. It also provides transparency between us and the professionals we are speaking to, so no problems arise further along in the process.

  • Too many agencies to choose from

    • As the world’s largest family-run recruitment company, we have been helping to improve lives through work for over 60 years. Our specialist recruiters are well versed in their sectors, they’re aware of the latest market trends, and have the best salary benchmarking information - all vital for finding the best candidates, promptly.

    • Our specialist recruiters will work in partnership with you and other stakeholders, using their extensive experience to ensure you get the right professionals for the task at hand. Reed’s fair, open and honest attitude to recruitment, market-leading guarantees and practice-led approach mean we can help you solve your people challenges fast.

  • High volume recruitment

    • Our specialist consultants are skilled in delivering high-volume recruitment projects. We take the time to carefully screen any potential candidates to ensure they meet your desired specification. Our consultants have face-to-face interviews will all of our candidates to discuss their motivations, skills and experience to ensure they can demonstrate to us that they have the correct knowledge and skills to carry out the role to a high standard.

Our multilingual shared services specialists

Klaudia Győri

Klaudia Győri

Team Manager Reed Hungary

Klaudia has over 4 years of recruitment industry experience with expertise in Sales & Marketing and Logistics recruitment solutions. Klaudia is Team Manager and beside the recruitment and business development tasks, she is also responsible for the Business Support team.

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Start a conversation with one of our multilingual shared services recruiters

Send a brief overview of your requirements and we will contact you to find out more about your needs.

What's happening...

Rolling Wireless recruits software development team
2 minute read

Rolling Wireless recruits software development team

​​The challengeRolling Wireless, a global supplier of 4G and 5G modules for the automotive market, first chose Reed to help them fill a director role in 2021, which was swiftly done. The employer has offices around the world and was planning to open another in Hungary, led by their new Software Platform Director, Lajos Rancz, who was placed by talent scout, Anna Böröcz, Senior Recruitment Consultant at Reed. She explained: “After we found the ideal candidate in Lajos, we started working together to build the Hungarian software development team around him.” Lajos was looking to create a department of some 20-30 people and was keen to have Reed’s support and specialist tech knowledge. He said: “In the past, we tried to work with freelance head-hunters, but it was not very successful.” Anna was sure her team could provide the help Lajos needed, tailoring the service to the company’s budget and requirements. The solutionAnna sourced candidates mainly on LinkedIn, managing the hiring process with typical Reed professionalism: providing regular updates to all parties, careful to maintain “a quick reaction time and continuous feedback”.   Hungary’s tech labour market has seen greater demands from jobseekers in terms of higher pay and the ability to work from home. Other than that, the search was straightforward, according to Anna: “I told prospective candidates the expectations of each role in detail, the tasks, and made sure they had similar experience to what was required.”  Lajos added: “We have now been working with Reed continuously since last autumn, recruiting the Hungarian development team, and have several Reed candidates working for us. We are happy with them, and they are a very good team.   “Overall, we’re very satisfied with our working relationship with Reed, who have provided us with quality candidates.”  The resultsThe tech team is taking shape: so far, 11 candidates have received an offer from Rolling Wireless, of which eight have accepted.   Of the outcome, Anna said: “Rolling Wireless is pleased with our service, which I am very happy about – I also really like working with them. The candidates are fitting in well and like their new workplace.”  Attesting to this is Gábor Wunderlich, Senior Embedded Software Engineer, placed by Reed into the new Rolling Wireless team, who commented: “I can only confirm my positive experience. Frequent communication with Anna helped make the recruitment process a success – she ensured full contact between the company and me, quickly and accurately communicating messages and requests between us.” Gábor is also pleased with the development opportunities that his new role offers, which allows him to improve his English language skills through regular contact with foreign colleagues. He concluded: “I won't be looking for a new position anytime soon, and I highly recommend anyone looking for a new job to try Reed.” Looking to hire a talented professional or take the next step in your career? Contact your local office and speak to one of our specialist recruiters. 

Redundancy letter templates & examples
6 minute read
  1. Article

Redundancy letter templates & examples

​Making redundancies is never a pleasant experience, but it’s sometimes unavoidable and employers need to ensure they navigate the process with sensitivity and professionalism, and adhere to the law, or they may face employment tribunals and unfair dismissal claims.A redundancy letter is a written communication from an employer to an employee that informs them of their job loss due to a reduction in the workforce. To help employers manage this process and ensure they provide employees with clear and concise information, we have compiled a selection of adaptable redundancy letter templates for the various stages of the redundancy procedure.When would you need to write a redundancy letter?Employers may have to write redundancy letters in the following circumstances: Economic downturnsDuring a time of economic decline or recession, businesses may experience a reduction in revenue, leading to reduced demand for their products or services. In such circumstances, businesses may look to reduce their workforce to cut costs. RestructuringCompanies may need to restructure their operations, departments, or teams due to changes in the market, mergers and acquisitions, or changes in leadership, which could lead to redundancies. Technological advancementsWith advancements in technology, businesses may require less manual labour, leading to a reduction in the workforce. Employers may have to make employees redundant where their jobs have been automated or outsourced. What is the difference between voluntary and compulsory redundancy?Voluntary redundancy is when an employer offers an employee the option to leave their job in exchange for a financial package, which could include a lump sum payment, extended notice period, and other benefits. Employees who accept voluntary redundancy do so voluntarily, and their decision is not influenced by their employer.In contrast, compulsory redundancy is when an employer selects an employee to leave their job due to a reduction in the workforce, restructuring, or other reasons. Employees who are made redundant involuntarily do not have a choice in the matter and may be entitled to statutory redundancy pay and other benefits.What are the stages of a redundancy process? The redundancy process can be broken down into stages and logical steps that employers can follow. The stages are: preparation, selection, individual consultations, notice of redundancy, appeals (if applicable), and termination.Stage one: PreparationDuring the preparation stage, you will assess whether redundancy is the only option and is completely necessary before beginning the process. If you are concerned with your employee’s performance or behaviour, then you should go down the disciplinary route instead.Redundancy is a type of dismissal where the employee’s job is no longer required. Ensure that you have covered all alternative options and if you have concluded that redundancy is essential, establish a time frame and prepare the relevant documentation.Stage two: SelectionAt this stage, you will be selecting the people who are under consideration for redundancy. You’ll need to determine the criteria for selecting those employees which should be objective and fair across the workforce.Additionally, now is the time to inform employees of the upcoming redundancies. This should also include those who are not under consideration. You should explain that there is the risk of redundancy, the reason why it’s necessary, roughly how many redundancies you're considering, and what will happen next.Stage three: Individual consultationsThe consultations stage is a hugely important part of the redundancy process, and it’s essential that employers look at this as an open discussion with the employee, rather than using this time to just inform them of their potential redundancy.You should explain why they have been selected and discuss alternative employment in the company. Employees will have the chance to make suggestions as to how the business can retain them and these suggestions should be considered fairly, or the employer may face unfair dismissal claims.Note: there are legal time frames regarding consultations, so make sure you adhere to these.Stage four: Notice of redundancyOnce you have finished consulting with everyone and made your decision, you should meet with each at-risk employee to discuss the outcome. Ideally, do this face to face, but if this is not possible, organise a phone call.Those who have been selected for redundancy should also receive confirmation in writing, by letter or email. We have included a redundancy notice letter template for your ease.Stage five: AppealsIf an employee feels they have been unfairly chosen for redundancy or if they think there were discriminatory issues in the process, it is essential to offer them the opportunity to appeal within a reasonable time frame after they have received their redundancy notice. This could be, for instance, five days. The employee should submit their reasons for appeal in writing. Once you receive an appeal, you should arrange a meeting with the employee as soon as possible.If it becomes clear that the employee was selected unfairly but you still need to make the role redundant, you must manage the situation with great care. This could mean ending the employment of another employee who was informed their job was secure. It is important to communicate clearly and openly with your staff, rectify any issues with the process, and ensure a fair selection procedure is carried out. If serious problems are identified, you may need to repeat the entire redundancy process.If you decide to reject the appeal, the employee's redundancy dismissal, notice, and pay will continue as before.Stage six: TerminationThis is the final stage of the redundancy process where the employment contract is terminated. During this stage, you should be supportive and give your employee reasonable time to find another job while they work their notice period.All employees who have been with the company for more than two years qualify for a statutory redundancy payment. Provide the employees with a written record of how the statutory redundancy payment has been calculated and what they will receive.What should be included in a redundancy letter?The redundancy letter to the employee should clearly state the reasons for the employment termination and the terms of their departure. Here are some key pieces of information that should be included in a redundancy letter:Reason for redundancy: The letter should clearly state the reasons for the redundancy, such as economic downturn, restructuring, or technological advancements.Selection criteria: Employers should explain the selection criteria used to determine which employees are being made redundant. This could include factors such as length of service, skills and qualifications, and job performance.Notice period: Employers should provide details of the employee's notice period, including the start and end dates, as well as any entitlements to pay in lieu of notice.Redundancy pay: The letter should provide information on the employee's entitlement to statutory redundancy pay, as well as any additional redundancy pay provided by the employer.Benefits: Employers should explain what happens to the employee's benefits, such as healthcare, pension, and life insurance, after they leave.Support: Employers should offer support to the employee during this difficult time, including assistance with finding new employment opportunities and access to training programmes.To help you navigate this challenging process, we have put together a selection of redundancy letter templates that can be used at various stages throughout the process. These include:Redundancy consultation letterRedundancy consultation outcome letterInvitation to redundancy outcome meeting letterNotice of redundancy letter

How to effectively manage staff redundancies
5 minute read

How to effectively manage staff redundancies

​Due to the current economic climate, businesses may be presented with some difficult decisions to make regarding their workforce, including redundancy.Employers may have to write redundancy letters during economic downturns - when the business is experiencing a reduction in revenue, when restructuring operations or departments due to changes in the market, or when technological advancements mean jobs have become automated or outsourced.Managing and making staff redundancies across a business is often an unpleasant but necessary task that many employers may have to consider when reducing their headcount. When faced with the prospect of making redundancies, it’s important for employers to manage the process effectively and efficiently to minimise the impact on both the affected employees and the entire business.Here are some steps employers can take to manage staff redundancies:Create a redundancy planHaving a redundancy plan in place will help employers effectively manage every stage of the process, from consultation and planning to notification and evaluation. It’s important to make sure the initial plan includes checks to see if there is a genuine redundancy situation, what the timescales are, and how consultation will take place.For each stage of the plan, a record needs to be kept, ensuring the entire process is accountable to be delivered efficiently and legally. Redundancy plans should include: An explanation as to why redundancies are being made A timetable outlining next stepsThe meeting process for all affected employeesThe meeting process for all unaffected employeesAn outline of the redundancy criteria and selection processHow the announcements will be madeIf redundancies are in fact unavoidable, the latter stages of the plan should also include selection, notices and payments.Be lawful, fair and transparentRedundancy can be seen as a fair reason for dismissal, but should only be used in certain circumstances where the employee’s role no longer exists and/or is no longer required within the business.As such, when considering employees for redundancy, employers should use a selection criteria that is fair and objective, which might include an employee’s:SkillsExperiencePerformanceLength of serviceEmployers must comply with employment laws and regulations when managing redundancies. According to the Equality Act 2010, it’s unlawful to make someone redundant by reason of a protected characteristic. These include age, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, disability, race or religion.Following the correct legal procedure is imperative, as failure to do so can lead to wrongful dismissal claims. Employers should consult with employees and/or their representatives when making decisions that affect their jobs.Offer clear communicationAs with most situations that concern employees, communication is key when it comes to managing redundancies. Be open and honest with employees about the situation – it always helps to explain the reasons for the redundancy and provide as much information as possible about the process.This information can be hard to hear, so employers are encouraged to act sensitively to the emotions of those affected and provide support where necessary. For that reason, the process needs to be transparent, and employees should know what to expect throughout.Alongside the employee, it’s important to remember that redundancies can impact the business in more ways than one – and stakeholders with an interest in the organisation should also receive clear communication. Anyone from customers to suppliers and investors have the right to be informed about any changes, but the focus should be on reassuring them about the future of the business.Remember, communication is there to help to manage any negative impact on the organisation’s reputation or relationships.Provide employee support and guidanceRedundancy can be a traumatic experience for any employee. Therefore, providing the necessary support and guidance to help affected workers cope with the news can go a long way, not only in terms of maintaining best practice but for business reputation.Employers can help employees through:Finding new employmentAccessing training and reskilling opportunitiesCV support and career coachingJob search advice and recommendationsAs redundancy is a last option, it’s worth considering whether there are any suitable alternative roles within the business that impacted employees could be offered.Anyone who has worked for their employer for at least two years at the time their job ends should be offered an alternative role if one is available, or at least be made aware of any opportunities across the business. This may involve individuals undertaking training or upskilling to take on different roles – but if the offer isn’t taken up, the employee will be deemed as dismissed through redundancy and be entitled to receive statutory redundancy pay.This payment is there to help employees during the transition period as they look for new employment, and should be calculated correctly and paid in a timely manner.Consider remaining employeesRedundancies can have a significant impact on remaining employees, who may feel demotivated, stressed, or uncertain about their own job security. As much as the focus may be on creating a supportive environment for those leaving the company, be mindful to keep your existing workforce updated and supported throughout the stressful period.While those workers may not have faced dismissal, they may have been affected by witnessing the experience of their colleagues, which can negatively impact their morale. This can be harmful to the working environment, business operations and to employee performance.Continue to learn and adaptManaging redundancies can be a difficult process, but it can also provide an opportunity for an organisation to learn from the experience and improve upon its practices. Employers should conduct a post-redundancy review to evaluate the situation and identify any areas for improvement so, if it does need to happen again, the business is better prepared.During the redundancy talks, it may be worth taking any feedback on board from the affected employees. This can be used to make changes to any practice and policy currently in place, and, most importantly, improve the support and guidance provided. Proactive measures can help build resilience and better prepare managers for any future challenges.Employers should also look at their redundancy process as a whole, making sure line managers are able to confidently deal with these types of situation. According to research by employment law support firm WorkNest, 74% of employers aren’t providing any training to their line managers on how to handle redundancies – indicating the scale of potential emotional damage that could be routinely occurring though no fault of their own.Staff redundancies can be a challenge, but it’s imperative that the process runs as smoothly as possible. By taking the time to plan, execute and evaluate the task, employers can minimise the impact that redundancies can have on all involved.​